Feed aggregator

HMT Arfon: Sunken WWI mine trawler protected

Science & Environment - 18 August, 2016 - 23:19
The sunken wreck of a fishing trawler that swept for mines during World War One is given special protection by Historic England.
Categories: world news

7 days quiz

World News - 18 August, 2016 - 23:03
The Magazine's weekly quiz of the news, 7 days 7 questions.
Categories: world news

Olympic strangeness

World News - 18 August, 2016 - 22:54
Gold medals and drama are all very well, but what about the strange little details that marked out the Rio Olympics?
Categories: world news

Wigan council takes new approach to tackle child obesity

Education News - 18 August, 2016 - 22:25
Wigan council is taking a new approach to tackling child obesity by inviting children with weight problems on an eighteen month fitness programme that teaches them about being active and eating well.
Categories: world news

Daily Design Inspiration

abduzeedo - 18 August, 2016 - 21:59
Daily Design Inspiration AoiroStudio Aug 18, 2016

Part of the Daily Inspiration series that started it all on Abduzeedo. This is where you'll find the most interesting things/finds/work curated by one of us to simply inspire your day. Furthermore, it's an opportunity to feature work from more designers, photographers, and artists in general that we haven't had the chance to write or feature about in the past.

For this Daily we are selecting some works in branding, interior design, web design and more. Our goal is to diversify the types of work and in the future we can perhaps categorize them in different sections. For now we are going to stick to the simple format of images and links. I hope you enjoy and share with use via Twitter or our Tumblr.

Until further notice, we'll display the images and the titles added to them. Because of little issues we had in the past, the images are still linked to their authors, we just won't mentioned who shared them like we used to.

Design Inspiration daily inspiration
Categories: art & design

Andante Ideas

abduzeedo - 18 August, 2016 - 21:11
Andante Ideas AoiroStudio Aug 18, 2016

We've previously featured the work from Serafim Mendes with Invisible Cities on Abduzeedo and now he's back with a collaboration with Danny Ivan on their submission for Andante Design Contest where they had to create a new concept for the metro cards on its branding and also providing designs for advertising and promotional content.

The challenge was to be limited by using Andante's existing logo and colours. For those who don't know, Andante is the intermodal ticketing system used in public transportation in the metropolitan area of Porto, Portugal. Let's take a look at their beautifully done concept and see what was their thinking behind their idea.

Submission for the Andante Ideas Contest, hosted by Transportes Intermodais do Porto (TIP). A project by Danny Ivan and Serafim Mendes.   Credits Design Contest branding illustration graphic design
Categories: art & design

Multiple Experiments with Squarespace

abduzeedo - 18 August, 2016 - 20:32
Multiple Experiments with Squarespace AoiroStudio Aug 18, 2016

We are following the work of Andre do Amaraland his team over Squarespace. Andre has been building a team and working on several experiments. That's a great exercise to accomplish!

Judging by what's been showcased in this feature, we love the different explorations they did with the grid and how they are playing at fluidly integrating the content since most of their users really take the time to showcase content and pictures beautifully done. Also how they crafted the typography settings with a lot more negative space and how well it flows for the usability and the trail of the eyes while scrolling. Pretty awesome work!

I moved to Squarespace last year. Since then, I’ve been working in building a team and designing multiple experiments for Squarespace’s main website.   Credits
  • CEO: Anthony Casalena
  • Chief Creative Officer: David Lee
  • Design Lead: Andre do Amaral
  • Design Lead: Andre Ribeiro
  • Design Lead: Tom Sears
  • Creative Developer: Charlton Roberts
  • Creative Developer: Michael Cavalea
UX/UI ui design
Categories: art & design

Satellite images used to predict poverty

Science & Environment - 18 August, 2016 - 18:59
Researchers have combined satellite imagery with AI to predict areas of poverty across the world.
Categories: world news

Synthetic supermicrobe will be resistant to all known viruses

New Scientist Headlines - 18 August, 2016 - 18:00
A bacterium with a different genetic code to every other living things is in the pipeline. It will be resistant to all known viruses - and its inventor wants to alter humans in the same way
Categories: science

Birds sing to their unborn chicks to warn them about hot weather

New Scientist Headlines - 18 August, 2016 - 18:00
Zebra finch parents prepare their chicks for the heat by giving them advice – through the shell
Categories: science

Five times Ryan Lochte made a splash outside the pool

World News - 18 August, 2016 - 17:23
US Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte is embroiled in a bizarre scandal over an alleged mugging in Rio. But Americans were already familiar with some of his extracurricular antics.
Categories: world news

5 important things that happened in design this week

Design Week Features - 18 August, 2016 - 17:20
The number of students taking design at university level increased

A-Levels results day was this week, and UCAS revealed the number of students set to go to university this year had increased on last year.

The number of accepted places on art and design courses has also increased by 350 students – 1% – to a total of 45,650.

Research showed that art and design is one of the subject areas most studied by university students across the UK, coming second only to business and administrative studies.

But government research shows that the number of students taking up art and design A-Levels is declining, so this upward trend at university is likely to drop.

The soon-to-be compulsory English Baccalaureate qualification – which specifies that GCSE students must study English, Maths, Science, a language and a humanity – could be playing a part in this. Many creative leaders and politicians have scrutinised the qualification for “devaluing” creative subjects and placing them on the back burner.

The Premier League took on a new broadcast identity

The Premier League unveiled a rebrand completed by DesignStudio in February, which saw a new icon of a lion’s face and a bespoke typeface created by Monotype.

Now, digital design consultancy DixonBaxi has helped to bring the brand to life on-screen, through title sequences, idents and use of augmented reality and touch screen graphics.

The studio has also incorporated a new infographic system which aims to make sense of live data, league tables, charts and player profiles, making them more decipherable and unifying them under one style.

Sound design studio MassiveMusic has also created an “official anthem” and “walk on” music for use in stadiums.

Airbnb revealed its new Tokyo office space

Airbnb unveiled the interiors of its new office this week, which the company worked on alongside Japanese architect Suppose Office Design.

The office is based in Shinjuku, Tokyo, and has been designed to reinforce a sense of belonging, says Airbnb.

The space is also changeable, and employees can reconfigure communal work tables, height adjustable desks, phone booths, and even lounges and cafés.

You can peer inside the building, and read more about the interiors, here.

The new culture secretary promised to make arts and culture more diverse

Karen Bradley was appointed under Theresa May’s cabinet reshuffle, and gave her first official public speech this week, saying that arts and culture “must be available to everyone”.

She announced details of the Cultural Citizens Programme, a new initiative that looks to increase access to culture for 600 disadvantaged children across cities such as Liverpool and Blackpool.

Pilots of the initiative will launch next month, and aim to give children free visits to local plays, and access to museums, galleries and cultural venues.

Her words come as the EBacc qualification is set to be made compulsory across schools, which many have said will make the arts harder to access for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

But Bradley says she will work hard to make sure “no child is left out of this country’s magnificent and extraordinary cultural inheritance”.

Marie Claire and Ocado launched a store

Fabled by Marie Claire already existed as an online beauty store, but this week a bricks and mortar physical space was revealed.

The beauty store was created by Gpstudio and hopes to merge the “online and physical worlds”, through use of touch screens, and immersive areas devoted to testing and experimenting with products.

The store adopts a clinical, white interior look, with splashes of colour incorporated through product range displays. The branding, designed by The Clearing, uses a simple, sans-serif typeface with wide kerning.

The store is based near London’s Tottenham Court Road, and there are currently no plans to roll the concept out more widely.

The post 5 important things that happened in design this week appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

5 important things that happened in design this week

Design Week Latest Issue - 18 August, 2016 - 17:20
The number of students taking design at university level increased

A-Levels results day was this week, and UCAS revealed the number of students set to go to university this year had increased on last year.

The number of accepted places on art and design courses has also increased by 350 students – 1% – to a total of 45,650.

Research showed that art and design is one of the subject areas most studied by university students across the UK, coming second only to business and administrative studies.

But government research shows that the number of students taking up art and design A-Levels is declining, so this upward trend at university is likely to drop.

The soon-to-be compulsory English Baccalaureate qualification – which specifies that GCSE students must study English, Maths, Science, a language and a humanity – could be playing a part in this. Many creative leaders and politicians have scrutinised the qualification for “devaluing” creative subjects and placing them on the back burner.

The Premier League took on a new broadcast identity

The Premier League unveiled a rebrand completed by DesignStudio in February, which saw a new icon of a lion’s face and a bespoke typeface created by Monotype.

Now, digital design consultancy DixonBaxi has helped to bring the brand to life on-screen, through title sequences, idents and use of augmented reality and touch screen graphics.

The studio has also incorporated a new infographic system which aims to make sense of live data, league tables, charts and player profiles, making them more decipherable and unifying them under one style.

Sound design studio MassiveMusic has also created an “official anthem” and “walk on” music for use in stadiums.

Airbnb revealed its new Tokyo office space

Airbnb unveiled the interiors of its new office this week, which the company worked on alongside Japanese architect Suppose Office Design.

The office is based in Shinjuku, Tokyo, and has been designed to reinforce a sense of belonging, says Airbnb.

The space is also changeable, and employees can reconfigure communal work tables, height adjustable desks, phone booths, and even lounges and cafés.

You can peer inside the building, and read more about the interiors, here.

The new culture secretary promised to make arts and culture more diverse

Karen Bradley was appointed under Theresa May’s cabinet reshuffle, and gave her first official public speech this week, saying that arts and culture “must be available to everyone”.

She announced details of the Cultural Citizens Programme, a new initiative that looks to increase access to culture for 600 disadvantaged children across cities such as Liverpool and Blackpool.

Pilots of the initiative will launch next month, and aim to give children free visits to local plays, and access to museums, galleries and cultural venues.

Her words come as the EBacc qualification is set to be made compulsory across schools, which many have said will make the arts harder to access for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

But Bradley says she will work hard to make sure “no child is left out of this country’s magnificent and extraordinary cultural inheritance”.

Marie Claire and Ocado launched a store

Fabled by Marie Claire already existed as an online beauty store, but this week a bricks and mortar physical space was revealed.

The beauty store was created by Gpstudio and hopes to merge the “online and physical worlds”, through use of touch screens, and immersive areas devoted to testing and experimenting with products.

The store adopts a clinical, white interior look, with splashes of colour incorporated through product range displays. The branding, designed by The Clearing, uses a simple, sans-serif typeface with wide kerning.

The store is based near London’s Tottenham Court Road, and there are currently no plans to roll the concept out more widely.

The post 5 important things that happened in design this week appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

5 important things that happened in design this week

Design Week News - 18 August, 2016 - 17:20
The number of students taking design at university level increased

A-Levels results day was this week, and UCAS revealed the number of students set to go to university this year had increased on last year.

The number of accepted places on art and design courses has also increased by 350 students – 1% – to a total of 45,650.

Research showed that art and design is one of the subject areas most studied by university students across the UK, coming second only to business and administrative studies.

But government research shows that the number of students taking up art and design A-Levels is declining, so this upward trend at university is likely to drop.

The soon-to-be compulsory English Baccalaureate qualification – which specifies that GCSE students must study English, Maths, Science, a language and a humanity – could be playing a part in this. Many creative leaders and politicians have scrutinised the qualification for “devaluing” creative subjects and placing them on the back burner.

The Premier League took on a new broadcast identity

The Premier League unveiled a rebrand completed by DesignStudio in February, which saw a new icon of a lion’s face and a bespoke typeface created by Monotype.

Now, digital design consultancy DixonBaxi has helped to bring the brand to life on-screen, through title sequences, idents and use of augmented reality and touch screen graphics.

The studio has also incorporated a new infographic system which aims to make sense of live data, league tables, charts and player profiles, making them more decipherable and unifying them under one style.

Sound design studio MassiveMusic has also created an “official anthem” and “walk on” music for use in stadiums.

Airbnb revealed its new Tokyo office space

Airbnb unveiled the interiors of its new office this week, which the company worked on alongside Japanese architect Suppose Office Design.

The office is based in Shinjuku, Tokyo, and has been designed to reinforce a sense of belonging, says Airbnb.

The space is also changeable, and employees can reconfigure communal work tables, height adjustable desks, phone booths, and even lounges and cafés.

You can peer inside the building, and read more about the interiors, here.

The new culture secretary promised to make arts and culture more diverse

Karen Bradley was appointed under Theresa May’s cabinet reshuffle, and gave her first official public speech this week, saying that arts and culture “must be available to everyone”.

She announced details of the Cultural Citizens Programme, a new initiative that looks to increase access to culture for 600 disadvantaged children across cities such as Liverpool and Blackpool.

Pilots of the initiative will launch next month, and aim to give children free visits to local plays, and access to museums, galleries and cultural venues.

Her words come as the EBacc qualification is set to be made compulsory across schools, which many have said will make the arts harder to access for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

But Bradley says she will work hard to make sure “no child is left out of this country’s magnificent and extraordinary cultural inheritance”.

Marie Claire and Ocado launched a store

Fabled by Marie Claire already existed as an online beauty store, but this week a bricks and mortar physical space was revealed.

The beauty store was created by Gpstudio and hopes to merge the “online and physical worlds”, through use of touch screens, and immersive areas devoted to testing and experimenting with products.

The store adopts a clinical, white interior look, with splashes of colour incorporated through product range displays. The branding, designed by The Clearing, uses a simple, sans-serif typeface with wide kerning.

The store is based near London’s Tottenham Court Road, and there are currently no plans to roll the concept out more widely.

The post 5 important things that happened in design this week appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Nottinghamshire dentist Desmond D'Mello struck off by General Dental Council

Education News - 18 August, 2016 - 17:16
A dentist who sparked "the biggest NHS patient recall in history" is struck off.
Categories: world news

Blockchain grid to let neighbours trade solar power in Australia

New Scientist Headlines - 18 August, 2016 - 17:00
Australian cities are set to trial the blockchain as a way to record sales of solar power between neighbours, changing the way we buy and sell energy
Categories: science

Reality Check: Would the sugar tax cost 4,000 jobs?

World News - 18 August, 2016 - 16:50
The British Soft Drinks Association says the sugar tax will cost 4,000 jobs. Is it right?
Categories: world news

Tourists flock to Kilauea Volcano lava streams

Science & Environment - 18 August, 2016 - 16:39
Tourists flock to Hawaii's Kilauea volcano after lava from its Pu'u O'o vent reached the sea. Aerials - Lava Ocean Tours.
Categories: world news

Battle for Aleppo

World News - 18 August, 2016 - 16:34
Syrian activists have released haunting pictures of a young boy rescued from a destroyed building after an air strike in the divided second city of Aleppo.
Categories: world news

Cooking Up Life in the Cosmic Kitchen

Universe Today - 18 August, 2016 - 16:29

Kitchens are where we create. From crumb cake to corn on the cob, it happens here. If you're like me, you've occasionally left a turkey too long in the oven or charred the grilled chicken. When meat gets burned, among the smells informing your nose of the bad news are flat molecules consisting of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb pattern called PAHs or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PAHs make up about 10% of the carbon in the universe and are not only found in your kitchen but also in outer space, where they were discovered in 1998. Even comets and meteorites contain PAHs. From the illustration, you can see they're made up of several to many interconnected rings of carbon atoms arranged in different ways to make different compounds. The more rings, the more complex the molecule, but the underlying pattern is the same for all. All life on Earth is based on carbon. A quick look at the human body reveals that 18.5% of it is made of that element alone. Why is carbon so crucial? Because it's able to bond to itself and a host of other atoms in a variety of ways to create a lots of complex molecules that allow living organisms to perform many functions. Carbon-rich PAHs may even have been involved in the evolution of life since they come in many forms with potentially many functions. One of those may have been to encourage the formation of RNA (partner to the "life molecule" DNA). In the continuing quest to learn how simple carbon molecules evolve into more complex ones and what role those compounds might play in the origin of life, an international team of researchers have focused NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and other observatories on PAHs found within the colorful Iris Nebula in the northern constellation Cepheus the King. Bavo Croiset of Leiden University in the Netherlands and team determined that when PAHs in the nebula are hit by ultraviolet radiation from its central star, they evolve into larger, more complex molecules. Scientists hypothesize that the growth of complex organic molecules like PAHs is one of the steps leading to the emergence of life. Strong UV light from a newborn massive star like the one that sets the Iris Nebula aglow would tend to break down large organic molecules into smaller ones, rather than build them up, according to the current view. To test this idea, researchers wanted to estimate the size of the molecules at various locations relative to the central star. Croiset’s team used SOFIA to get above most of the water vapor in the atmosphere so he could observe the nebula in infrared light, a form of light invisible to our eyes that we detect as heat. SOFIA’s instruments are sensitive to two infrared wavelengths that are produced by these particular molecules, which can be used to estimate their size. The team analyzed the SOFIA images in combination with data previously obtained by the Spitzer infrared space observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on the Big Island of Hawaii. The analysis indicates that the size of the PAH molecules in this nebula vary by location in a clear pattern. The average size of the molecules in the nebula’s central cavity surrounding the young star is larger than on the surface of the cloud at the outer edge of the cavity. They also got a surprise: radiation from the star resulted in net growth in the number of complex PAHs rather than their destruction into smaller pieces. In a paper published in Astronomy and Astrophysics, the team concluded that this molecular size variation is due both to some of the smallest molecules being destroyed by the harsh ultraviolet radiation field of the star, and to medium-sized molecules being irradiated so they combine into larger molecules. So much starts with stars. Not only do they create the carbon atoms at the foundation of biology, but it would appear they shepherd them into more complex forms, too. Truly, we can thank our lucky stars!

The post Cooking Up Life in the Cosmic Kitchen appeared first on Universe Today.

Categories: space
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