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A fossil may rewrite the story of how plants first lived on land

New Scientist Headlines - 30 April, 2018 - 16:00
A plant fossil that lay unnoticed for a century is unexpectedly large for something so old, and it could upend our ideas about the evolution of land plants
Categories: science

How some resistant bacteria can even eat antibiotics as food

New Scientist Headlines - 30 April, 2018 - 16:00
Hundreds of resistant bacteria are able to actively feed on antibiotics. Now we know how - and we may be able to use it to remove antibiotics from our water
Categories: science

How to stop copycat designers from stealing your work

Design Week Features - 30 April, 2018 - 15:49
Dids Macdonald, founder, Anti-Copying in Design

“Creating a proactive, preventative IP strategy is a good first step. IP isn’t rocket science!

Firstly, become IP savvy. This means: knowing and understanding the laws that protect you; registering your designs, remembering that UK and European Union (EU) registration authorities don’t examine applications, so what you submit is what you rely on; and ensuring you have agreements in place for collaborative design projects.

Secondly, if you can’t afford registration, my organisation Anti-Copying in Design (ACID) offers access to an online IP Databank for copyright and unregistered designs providing a safe, uniquely numbered certificate to record each stage of your design process. This is all crucial evidence for any designer.

Thirdly, watch the competition. Trademark your brand name if you can; the more you build up your reputation under your brand, the stronger protection you will have.

Next, shout loudly about your IP ownership. If you don’t want to be copied, say so with a simple, IP deterrent statement running through every page on your website. ACID can help with this.

Finally, encourage respect, compliance and respect of your own IP and demand it from others.

Usually only good ideas get copied – but imitation isn’t flattery if it costs you your business.”

Erika Clegg, co-founder, Spring

“The first point is to know the law. There’s a concise and simple guide from the Government online in the intellectual property section. What’s most relevant to designers just starting out is the impact your employment status has on your right to claim copyright, so take 10 minutes to get your head around it now.

Secondly, if you feel your copyright has been infringed, you must be able to explain yourself clearly. This is one of the many reasons that great design has strategy behind it – strategy ensures you can frame your design explanation in objective rather than subjective terms, and clarify why you designed what you did, how you did.”

Sarah Weir, CEO, Design Council

“Protecting your precious design is, in equal measure, as important as having created your precious design in the first place. Creation without protection means it isn’t just yours, but could easily become someone else’s right under your nose. If you think IP sounds boring, legalistic and too much like red tape, think again. It will be even more boring and legalistic if you end up in court trying to untangle someone having infringed upon your rights. There are plenty of experienced people who can help, so I advise going to them. The Intellectual Property Office (IPO) can advise on registering your designs, and ACID provides membership for designers and also campaigns for their intellectual property rights.”

Emily Penny, brand consultant, Colourful

“Creatives often, understandably, focus more on the making than the business of making. But it’s good to remember that visual assets are exactly that – assets. It’s something constantly reinforced for me in my branding work and consultancy in effectiveness case studies.

Intellectual property is such an important concept because it acknowledges that creativity and invention is valuable and creators have rights. And to protect your work the fundamental thing is seeing the value yourself, sometimes in the face of being told otherwise.

To the people who didn’t take you seriously when you studied art or design, to those who saw it as a hobby, to the clients who ask for free work in exchange for exposure, to the firms who think new graduates don’t need to be paid – this is all wrong. Design shapes the future, it delivers profit and it has value.

Your mind-set is key. Take a minute to stop valuing your work by working hours and material costs and think about what it will achieve. Then you’ll be more likely to take steps to assert ownership and get the credit you deserve.”

Ruth Wasserman, design director, Made

“The best thing that new designers can do to protect their work is to educate themselves in the basics of the law. ACID offers stepped fees so if you are just starting out you can join for a small amount and make use of their in-depth knowledge and advice. Design registration is very costly for independent designers, but knowing unregistered design rights’ limitations can be helpful in knowing what protection you do have.”

Rosy Greenlees, executive director, Crafts Council

“It’s always good to keep a paper trail: note face-to-face or phone conversations with follow-up emails; date your images; sign and date designs; use the © logo as a deterrent. That said, I would advise people to continue to create the best version of their own creative vision – continue to take risks and push yourself creatively. That can never truly be copied or taken away from you.”

Do you have advice for designers on protecting their work from copyright infringement? Let us know in the comments below.

The post How to stop copycat designers from stealing your work appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

How to stop copycat designers from stealing your work

Design Week Latest Issue - 30 April, 2018 - 15:49
Dids Macdonald, founder, Anti-Copying in Design

“Creating a proactive, preventative IP strategy is a good first step. IP isn’t rocket science!

Firstly, become IP savvy. This means: knowing and understanding the laws that protect you; registering your designs, remembering that UK and European Union (EU) registration authorities don’t examine applications, so what you submit is what you rely on; and ensuring you have agreements in place for collaborative design projects.

Secondly, if you can’t afford registration, my organisation Anti-Copying in Design (ACID) offers access to an online IP Databank for copyright and unregistered designs providing a safe, uniquely numbered certificate to record each stage of your design process. This is all crucial evidence for any designer.

Thirdly, watch the competition. Trademark your brand name if you can; the more you build up your reputation under your brand, the stronger protection you will have.

Next, shout loudly about your IP ownership. If you don’t want to be copied, say so with a simple, IP deterrent statement running through every page on your website. ACID can help with this.

Finally, encourage respect, compliance and respect of your own IP and demand it from others.

Usually only good ideas get copied – but imitation isn’t flattery if it costs you your business.”

Erika Clegg, co-founder, Spring

“The first point is to know the law. There’s a concise and simple guide from the Government online in the intellectual property section. What’s most relevant to designers just starting out is the impact your employment status has on your right to claim copyright, so take 10 minutes to get your head around it now.

Secondly, if you feel your copyright has been infringed, you must be able to explain yourself clearly. This is one of the many reasons that great design has strategy behind it – strategy ensures you can frame your design explanation in objective rather than subjective terms, and clarify why you designed what you did, how you did.”

Sarah Weir, CEO, Design Council

“Protecting your precious design is, in equal measure, as important as having created your precious design in the first place. Creation without protection means it isn’t just yours, but could easily become someone else’s right under your nose. If you think IP sounds boring, legalistic and too much like red tape, think again. It will be even more boring and legalistic if you end up in court trying to untangle someone having infringed upon your rights. There are plenty of experienced people who can help, so I advise going to them. The Intellectual Property Office (IPO) can advise on registering your designs, and ACID provides membership for designers and also campaigns for their intellectual property rights.”

Emily Penny, brand consultant, Colourful

“Creatives often, understandably, focus more on the making than the business of making. But it’s good to remember that visual assets are exactly that – assets. It’s something constantly reinforced for me in my branding work and consultancy in effectiveness case studies.

Intellectual property is such an important concept because it acknowledges that creativity and invention is valuable and creators have rights. And to protect your work the fundamental thing is seeing the value yourself, sometimes in the face of being told otherwise.

To the people who didn’t take you seriously when you studied art or design, to those who saw it as a hobby, to the clients who ask for free work in exchange for exposure, to the firms who think new graduates don’t need to be paid – this is all wrong. Design shapes the future, it delivers profit and it has value.

Your mind-set is key. Take a minute to stop valuing your work by working hours and material costs and think about what it will achieve. Then you’ll be more likely to take steps to assert ownership and get the credit you deserve.”

Ruth Wasserman, design director, Made

“The best thing that new designers can do to protect their work is to educate themselves in the basics of the law. ACID offers stepped fees so if you are just starting out you can join for a small amount and make use of their in-depth knowledge and advice. Design registration is very costly for independent designers, but knowing unregistered design rights’ limitations can be helpful in knowing what protection you do have.”

Rosy Greenlees, executive director, Crafts Council

“It’s always good to keep a paper trail: note face-to-face or phone conversations with follow-up emails; date your images; sign and date designs; use the © logo as a deterrent. That said, I would advise people to continue to create the best version of their own creative vision – continue to take risks and push yourself creatively. That can never truly be copied or taken away from you.”

Do you have advice for designers on protecting their work from copyright infringement? Let us know in the comments below.

The post How to stop copycat designers from stealing your work appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

How to stop copycat designers from stealing your work

Design Week News - 30 April, 2018 - 15:49
Dids Macdonald, founder, Anti-Copying in Design

“Creating a proactive, preventative IP strategy is a good first step. IP isn’t rocket science!

Firstly, become IP savvy. This means: knowing and understanding the laws that protect you; registering your designs, remembering that UK and European Union (EU) registration authorities don’t examine applications, so what you submit is what you rely on; and ensuring you have agreements in place for collaborative design projects.

Secondly, if you can’t afford registration, my organisation Anti-Copying in Design (ACID) offers access to an online IP Databank for copyright and unregistered designs providing a safe, uniquely numbered certificate to record each stage of your design process. This is all crucial evidence for any designer.

Thirdly, watch the competition. Trademark your brand name if you can; the more you build up your reputation under your brand, the stronger protection you will have.

Next, shout loudly about your IP ownership. If you don’t want to be copied, say so with a simple, IP deterrent statement running through every page on your website. ACID can help with this.

Finally, encourage respect, compliance and respect of your own IP and demand it from others.

Usually only good ideas get copied – but imitation isn’t flattery if it costs you your business.”

Erika Clegg, co-founder, Spring

“The first point is to know the law. There’s a concise and simple guide from the Government online in the intellectual property section. What’s most relevant to designers just starting out is the impact your employment status has on your right to claim copyright, so take 10 minutes to get your head around it now.

Secondly, if you feel your copyright has been infringed, you must be able to explain yourself clearly. This is one of the many reasons that great design has strategy behind it – strategy ensures you can frame your design explanation in objective rather than subjective terms, and clarify why you designed what you did, how you did.”

Sarah Weir, CEO, Design Council

“Protecting your precious design is, in equal measure, as important as having created your precious design in the first place. Creation without protection means it isn’t just yours, but could easily become someone else’s right under your nose. If you think IP sounds boring, legalistic and too much like red tape, think again. It will be even more boring and legalistic if you end up in court trying to untangle someone having infringed upon your rights. There are plenty of experienced people who can help, so I advise going to them. The Intellectual Property Office (IPO) can advise on registering your designs, and ACID provides membership for designers and also campaigns for their intellectual property rights.”

Emily Penny, brand consultant, Colourful

“Creatives often, understandably, focus more on the making than the business of making. But it’s good to remember that visual assets are exactly that – assets. It’s something constantly reinforced for me in my branding work and consultancy in effectiveness case studies.

Intellectual property is such an important concept because it acknowledges that creativity and invention is valuable and creators have rights. And to protect your work the fundamental thing is seeing the value yourself, sometimes in the face of being told otherwise.

To the people who didn’t take you seriously when you studied art or design, to those who saw it as a hobby, to the clients who ask for free work in exchange for exposure, to the firms who think new graduates don’t need to be paid – this is all wrong. Design shapes the future, it delivers profit and it has value.

Your mind-set is key. Take a minute to stop valuing your work by working hours and material costs and think about what it will achieve. Then you’ll be more likely to take steps to assert ownership and get the credit you deserve.”

Ruth Wasserman, design director, Made

“The best thing that new designers can do to protect their work is to educate themselves in the basics of the law. ACID offers stepped fees so if you are just starting out you can join for a small amount and make use of their in-depth knowledge and advice. Design registration is very costly for independent designers, but knowing unregistered design rights’ limitations can be helpful in knowing what protection you do have.”

Rosy Greenlees, executive director, Crafts Council

“It’s always good to keep a paper trail: note face-to-face or phone conversations with follow-up emails; date your images; sign and date designs; use the © logo as a deterrent. That said, I would advise people to continue to create the best version of their own creative vision – continue to take risks and push yourself creatively. That can never truly be copied or taken away from you.”

Do you have advice for designers on protecting their work from copyright infringement? Let us know in the comments below.

The post How to stop copycat designers from stealing your work appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Debut novelist reveals how sickle cell disease inspired her book

Education News - 30 April, 2018 - 15:31
Debut novelist Adebayo Ayobami reveals how sickle cell disease inspired her book.
Categories: world news

North Korea’s nuclear-free pledge comes with a massive catch

New Scientist Headlines - 30 April, 2018 - 15:19
Last week saw a historic meeting between the leaders of North and South Korea, but the promise of a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula may not be so easy
Categories: science

Chair: 500 pieces of furniture that have shaped design history

Design Week Features - 30 April, 2018 - 15:12

The chair; a simple yet ubiquitous item of furniture that has served as something to sit on for thousands of years. From 16th century stone stools through to the technology-powered chairs of today which change shape, size or warmth to suit the person, there have been a myriad of styles and designs throughout the object’s history.

A new book from Phaidon – Chair: 500 Designs that Matter – written by the publisher’s editorial director Emilia Terragni delves into the object’s history and variety, exploring chairs that differ in material, shape, style, design and ergonomics.

Terragni picks out five classic designs from the book and explains why they have stood the test of time and are so important to furniture design today.

Chair n. 14, Thonet – 1859 to present by Michael Thonet, 1859, courtesy of Gebrüder Thonet (1859 to 1976), Thonet (1976 to present), Gebrüder Thonet Vienna (1976 to present). © Gebruder Thonet Vienna.

When looking at this chair now, you might think it is a beautiful piece of craft design. In reality, while being similar in style to other chairs of the period, it is one of the first, fully industrially-manufactured chairs in history – designed to be produced and assembled on an unprecedented scale. Michael Thonet developed a process of steam-bending wooden strips and rods, that could then be put together with screws, without the need for carving or glue. This allowed the furniture to be mass-produced, easily-shipped, and put together at its end destination. Still in production over 150 years later, this beautiful and timeless object is a lasting testament to what good design can achieve.

1006 Navy Chair, Emeco – 1944 to present 1006 Navy Chair, 1944, US Navy Engineering Team, Emeco Design Team and Alcoa Design Team; Emeco (1944 to present). © Emeco.

Commissioned by the US Navy during the final years of World War Two, this chair was the result of a collaboration between furniture maker Emeco and Alcoa, an American aluminium production company. Designed to be used at sea – specifically on submarines – the brief was very precise: the chair needed to be light but durable, resistant to corrosion, and relatively cheap to produce. The choice of recycled aluminium and the straightforward shape ticked all the boxes. It’s a wonderful example of a chair designed for a very specific and focused use, that has become a ubiquitous object. Originally built to withstand tornadoes – and still boasting a lifetime warranty – today the chair is just as likely to be found in busy restaurants as it is in the family home.

Antelope Chair, Ernest Chair, Race furniture – 1951 to present Antelope Chair, 1951, Ernest Race (1913–64); Race Furniture (1951 to present). © Race Furniture.

Designed for the outdoor spaces of the Royal Festival Hall in London, this chair soon became one of the symbols of the Festival of Britain exhibition. Less machine-like than previous metal furniture developed at the Bauhaus, the organic form of this chair and its friendly details such as the ball feet, succeeded in communicating the post-war optimism of the industry. Still in production, available with a powder-coated, steel-rod frame in a range of colours and a lacquered or painted wooden seat, the chair effortlessly captures the spirit of the time, playing its role in the massive, mid-century modern revival we’re experiencing today.

Panton Chair, Verner Panton, Vitra – 1967 to present Panton Chair, 1967, Verner Panton (1926 – 1998); Herman Miller/Vitra (1967 to 1979), Horn/ WK-Verband (1983 to 1989), Vitra (1990 to present). © Vitra Design Museum, photos © Bill Sharpe and Charles Eames.

A chair normally has a seat, a back and four legs that are produced separately and then assembled together. This, however – the cantilevered, stacking Panton chair – is a continuous, un-jointed S, where the back flows seamlessly into seat, which in turn flows into base. Its beautiful, sculptural look makes this chair a unique object. Designed in the late 1950s, its manufacture was almost technologically impossible, and it was only due to the perseverance of the designer, Verner Panton, and the engineering capabilities of Vitra, that this chair was successfully realised. Today its production is much easier of course, but it is thanks to the collaborative efforts of designer and manufacturer that we can enjoy one of the most striking design icons of the 20th century.

Aeron Chair, Donald T Chadwick, Herman Miller 1994 Aaron Chair, 1994, Donald T Chadwick (1936–), William Stumpf (1936–2006); Herman Miller (1994 to present). © Herman Miller.

Probably one of the best-selling chairs ever produced, the Aeron chair was a new kind of office chair. Introduced during a period when people were beginning to spend more and more time in front of computers, this chair was the result of extensive ergonomic research, studies on incorrect posture and unsuitable seating, and a collective desire for extra comfort. Without added padding, but instead with an innovative and supporting net, the chair naturally follows the complex movement of the human body. Produced in three different sizes, and offering infinite possibilities for adjusting the seat, back and arm rests, this chair is suitable and comfortable for all kind of bodies and positions.

Chair: 500 Designs that Matter is available now through Phaidon’s website for £16.95. For more info, head here.

The post Chair: 500 pieces of furniture that have shaped design history appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Chair: 500 pieces of furniture that have shaped design history

Design Week Latest Issue - 30 April, 2018 - 15:12

The chair; a simple yet ubiquitous item of furniture that has served as something to sit on for thousands of years. From 16th century stone stools through to the technology-powered chairs of today which change shape, size or warmth to suit the person, there have been a myriad of styles and designs throughout the object’s history.

A new book from Phaidon – Chair: 500 Designs that Matter – written by the publisher’s editorial director Emilia Terragni delves into the object’s history and variety, exploring chairs that differ in material, shape, style, design and ergonomics.

Terragni picks out five classic designs from the book and explains why they have stood the test of time and are so important to furniture design today.

Chair n. 14, Thonet – 1859 to present by Michael Thonet, 1859, courtesy of Gebrüder Thonet (1859 to 1976), Thonet (1976 to present), Gebrüder Thonet Vienna (1976 to present). © Gebruder Thonet Vienna.

When looking at this chair now, you might think it is a beautiful piece of craft design. In reality, while being similar in style to other chairs of the period, it is one of the first, fully industrially-manufactured chairs in history – designed to be produced and assembled on an unprecedented scale. Michael Thonet developed a process of steam-bending wooden strips and rods, that could then be put together with screws, without the need for carving or glue. This allowed the furniture to be mass-produced, easily-shipped, and put together at its end destination. Still in production over 150 years later, this beautiful and timeless object is a lasting testament to what good design can achieve.

1006 Navy Chair, Emeco – 1944 to present 1006 Navy Chair, 1944, US Navy Engineering Team, Emeco Design Team and Alcoa Design Team; Emeco (1944 to present). © Emeco.

Commissioned by the US Navy during the final years of World War Two, this chair was the result of a collaboration between furniture maker Emeco and Alcoa, an American aluminium production company. Designed to be used at sea – specifically on submarines – the brief was very precise: the chair needed to be light but durable, resistant to corrosion, and relatively cheap to produce. The choice of recycled aluminium and the straightforward shape ticked all the boxes. It’s a wonderful example of a chair designed for a very specific and focused use, that has become a ubiquitous object. Originally built to withstand tornadoes – and still boasting a lifetime warranty – today the chair is just as likely to be found in busy restaurants as it is in the family home.

Antelope Chair, Ernest Chair, Race furniture – 1951 to present Antelope Chair, 1951, Ernest Race (1913–64); Race Furniture (1951 to present). © Race Furniture.

Designed for the outdoor spaces of the Royal Festival Hall in London, this chair soon became one of the symbols of the Festival of Britain exhibition. Less machine-like than previous metal furniture developed at the Bauhaus, the organic form of this chair and its friendly details such as the ball feet, succeeded in communicating the post-war optimism of the industry. Still in production, available with a powder-coated, steel-rod frame in a range of colours and a lacquered or painted wooden seat, the chair effortlessly captures the spirit of the time, playing its role in the massive, mid-century modern revival we’re experiencing today.

Panton Chair, Verner Panton, Vitra – 1967 to present Panton Chair, 1967, Verner Panton (1926 – 1998); Herman Miller/Vitra (1967 to 1979), Horn/ WK-Verband (1983 to 1989), Vitra (1990 to present). © Vitra Design Museum, photos © Bill Sharpe and Charles Eames.

A chair normally has a seat, a back and four legs that are produced separately and then assembled together. This, however – the cantilevered, stacking Panton chair – is a continuous, un-jointed S, where the back flows seamlessly into seat, which in turn flows into base. Its beautiful, sculptural look makes this chair a unique object. Designed in the late 1950s, its manufacture was almost technologically impossible, and it was only due to the perseverance of the designer, Verner Panton, and the engineering capabilities of Vitra, that this chair was successfully realised. Today its production is much easier of course, but it is thanks to the collaborative efforts of designer and manufacturer that we can enjoy one of the most striking design icons of the 20th century.

Aeron Chair, Donald T Chadwick, Herman Miller 1994 Aaron Chair, 1994, Donald T Chadwick (1936–), William Stumpf (1936–2006); Herman Miller (1994 to present). © Herman Miller.

Probably one of the best-selling chairs ever produced, the Aeron chair was a new kind of office chair. Introduced during a period when people were beginning to spend more and more time in front of computers, this chair was the result of extensive ergonomic research, studies on incorrect posture and unsuitable seating, and a collective desire for extra comfort. Without added padding, but instead with an innovative and supporting net, the chair naturally follows the complex movement of the human body. Produced in three different sizes, and offering infinite possibilities for adjusting the seat, back and arm rests, this chair is suitable and comfortable for all kind of bodies and positions.

Chair: 500 Designs that Matter is available now through Phaidon’s website for £16.95. For more info, head here.

The post Chair: 500 pieces of furniture that have shaped design history appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Chair: 500 pieces of furniture that have shaped design history

Design Week News - 30 April, 2018 - 15:12

The chair; a simple yet ubiquitous item of furniture that has served as something to sit on for thousands of years. From 16th century stone stools through to the technology-powered chairs of today which change shape, size or warmth to suit the person, there have been a myriad of styles and designs throughout the object’s history.

A new book from Phaidon – Chair: 500 Designs that Matter – written by the publisher’s editorial director Emilia Terragni delves into the object’s history and variety, exploring chairs that differ in material, shape, style, design and ergonomics.

Terragni picks out five classic designs from the book and explains why they have stood the test of time and are so important to furniture design today.

Chair n. 14, Thonet – 1859 to present by Michael Thonet, 1859, courtesy of Gebrüder Thonet (1859 to 1976), Thonet (1976 to present), Gebrüder Thonet Vienna (1976 to present). © Gebruder Thonet Vienna.

When looking at this chair now, you might think it is a beautiful piece of craft design. In reality, while being similar in style to other chairs of the period, it is one of the first, fully industrially-manufactured chairs in history – designed to be produced and assembled on an unprecedented scale. Michael Thonet developed a process of steam-bending wooden strips and rods, that could then be put together with screws, without the need for carving or glue. This allowed the furniture to be mass-produced, easily-shipped, and put together at its end destination. Still in production over 150 years later, this beautiful and timeless object is a lasting testament to what good design can achieve.

1006 Navy Chair, Emeco – 1944 to present 1006 Navy Chair, 1944, US Navy Engineering Team, Emeco Design Team and Alcoa Design Team; Emeco (1944 to present). © Emeco.

Commissioned by the US Navy during the final years of World War Two, this chair was the result of a collaboration between furniture maker Emeco and Alcoa, an American aluminium production company. Designed to be used at sea – specifically on submarines – the brief was very precise: the chair needed to be light but durable, resistant to corrosion, and relatively cheap to produce. The choice of recycled aluminium and the straightforward shape ticked all the boxes. It’s a wonderful example of a chair designed for a very specific and focused use, that has become a ubiquitous object. Originally built to withstand tornadoes – and still boasting a lifetime warranty – today the chair is just as likely to be found in busy restaurants as it is in the family home.

Antelope Chair, Ernest Chair, Race furniture – 1951 to present Antelope Chair, 1951, Ernest Race (1913–64); Race Furniture (1951 to present). © Race Furniture.

Designed for the outdoor spaces of the Royal Festival Hall in London, this chair soon became one of the symbols of the Festival of Britain exhibition. Less machine-like than previous metal furniture developed at the Bauhaus, the organic form of this chair and its friendly details such as the ball feet, succeeded in communicating the post-war optimism of the industry. Still in production, available with a powder-coated, steel-rod frame in a range of colours and a lacquered or painted wooden seat, the chair effortlessly captures the spirit of the time, playing its role in the massive, mid-century modern revival we’re experiencing today.

Panton Chair, Verner Panton, Vitra – 1967 to present Panton Chair, 1967, Verner Panton (1926 – 1998); Herman Miller/Vitra (1967 to 1979), Horn/ WK-Verband (1983 to 1989), Vitra (1990 to present). © Vitra Design Museum, photos © Bill Sharpe and Charles Eames.

A chair normally has a seat, a back and four legs that are produced separately and then assembled together. This, however – the cantilevered, stacking Panton chair – is a continuous, un-jointed S, where the back flows seamlessly into seat, which in turn flows into base. Its beautiful, sculptural look makes this chair a unique object. Designed in the late 1950s, its manufacture was almost technologically impossible, and it was only due to the perseverance of the designer, Verner Panton, and the engineering capabilities of Vitra, that this chair was successfully realised. Today its production is much easier of course, but it is thanks to the collaborative efforts of designer and manufacturer that we can enjoy one of the most striking design icons of the 20th century.

Aeron Chair, Donald T Chadwick, Herman Miller 1994 Aaron Chair, 1994, Donald T Chadwick (1936–), William Stumpf (1936–2006); Herman Miller (1994 to present). © Herman Miller.

Probably one of the best-selling chairs ever produced, the Aeron chair was a new kind of office chair. Introduced during a period when people were beginning to spend more and more time in front of computers, this chair was the result of extensive ergonomic research, studies on incorrect posture and unsuitable seating, and a collective desire for extra comfort. Without added padding, but instead with an innovative and supporting net, the chair naturally follows the complex movement of the human body. Produced in three different sizes, and offering infinite possibilities for adjusting the seat, back and arm rests, this chair is suitable and comfortable for all kind of bodies and positions.

Chair: 500 Designs that Matter is available now through Phaidon’s website for £16.95. For more info, head here.

The post Chair: 500 pieces of furniture that have shaped design history appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Plogging fitness trend sees runners picking up litter

Education News - 30 April, 2018 - 15:01
Joggers are picking up litter in a fitness trend that has come to the UK from Sweden.
Categories: world news

The Artphabet: a Tribute to Art and Typography

abduzeedo - 30 April, 2018 - 14:02
The Artphabet: a Tribute to Art and Typography abduzeedo Apr 30, 2018

Last week I shared a beautiful typography post on an alphabet that mixed 3D and cartoon effects. I mentioned that it was very unique amongst so many of these types of exercises. So for my surprise today I found yet another amazing post on the same topic. This time the good people from CESS ™ took the challenge and raised the bar even higher. They created an alphabet inspired by famous artists. Each letter representing one and the style that made the artist famous. For example, A is for Andy Warhol and C is for Mondrian.  Anyway, check them out, it's truly awesome. 

An Alphabet Tribute to the most famous modern and contemporary artists. Made during 36daysoftype.

Typography

For more information check out cesstm.com

Typography
Categories: art & design

'He started going blue so we had to give CPR'

Education News - 30 April, 2018 - 14:00
Alec Brown saved his baby son's life using recently-acquired CPR skills.
Categories: world news

Emoji: documenting the design story of an “accidental masterpiece”

Design Week Features - 30 April, 2018 - 13:37

Design Week: Tell us about how the original emoji came about.

Jesse Reed: The basic history goes like this – NTT DoCoMo is a large Japanese telecommunications company that was founded in 1991. Between 1991 and 1999, the company developed a revolutionary software called “i-mode”, primarily used for pagers and emails. A feature of i-mode was a pictorial component, and this is when the heart emoji was introduced to its interface. Shigetaka Kurita was an employee at DoCoMo working on the i-mode team, and in 1999 he was tasked with expanding the collection of “picture characters” (in other words, the emoji) into the i-mode software.

Kurita was limited to a 12×12 pixel grid, which was dictated by the screen technology at the time. Each emoji had to fit within this framework and there were no shortcuts. Because the grid is an even number, there is no way to actually centre any of the symmetrical emoji. This was a challenge that Kurita had to overcome during the design process.

Each emoji was a representation of an object most commonly found in Japanese culture. Kurita credits magazines and common street symbols, among other things, as a source of inspiration for the chosen emoji. He developed 176 emoji in approximately five weeks, and they were released immediately. There were no focus groups or testing, they simply wanted to see what would happen. The rest, as we all know, is history.

DW: Why do you think it took Western countries so long to catch on?

JR: I guess it’s like anything else that we don’t catch on to from the East, or other parts of the Western world for that matter. Why does Japan have taxi cabs with back doors that are opened by the driver, but the US doesn’t? Because Japanese people are so polite that it would be unthinkable for them to open their own door during their service. It’s specific to their culture.

I think emoji is very similar, and again, closely-related to Japanese life. Emotion and expression is arguably more intensified with a conversation in Japanese than it is in English. So when texting became a normal way of communicating, the lack of emotional impact was lost. They figured out a way to resolve the lack of additional expression with the use of pictures, and it worked.

We can’t speak for all of the Western world, but I would say there’s a fair bit of fascination with how other cultures communicate and the nuances of contrasting lifestyles. We’re a global society now, and that’s because we’re connected by the internet. It sounds so obvious that companies like Google and Apple would include emoji in the operating systems, but it takes a critical mass to influence that shift. Enough people were downloading apps to use emoji, so it was the natural next step – 10, long years later, that is. Maybe one day, emoticons will be cool again? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Shigetaka Kurita’s original development sketches

DW: You’ve described the design of the emoji as an “accidental masterpiece”. Why did you choose it for your next project?

JR: The idea was brought to us directly by Kickstarter. DoCoMo had approached someone at Kickstarter about doing an app that would include all the original emoji, and it was also at that time that the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) acquisition was on display. MoMA had too many things going on at the time so Kickstarter asked if we were interested. We had never done an app before so there was a slight hesitation, but we asked if DoCoMo had any sketches or drawings from the original set and they did. Once we saw Kurita’s original design process, we instantly thought this would make a great book.

DW: What are you planning to include in the book?

JR: Emoji will open with an introduction by Kurita, and Paul Galloway and Paola Antonelli from MoMA – who were responsible for the museum acquiring the designs – will also write an essay for the book. This will focus on the historical context and social relevancy of the emoji.

The bulk of the book will be the 176 emoji in their original form. Each emoji will be displayed on a single spread, including the colour version at an enlarged scale and full-size (how it would appear on a phone screen), as well as the emoji placed on its 12×12 pixel grid to show the nuances of each design.

The book will also include the original thumbnail sketches from Kurita – a particularly fascinating and, from our knowledge, rarely seen piece. It comprises a sheet of paper full of small emoji sketches, very roughly drawn and put together. It’s essentially the master idea-mapping chart for when Kurita and his team were deciding which objects to include. Lastly, we will also be including the extended set of 76 emojis that was developed by DoCoMo’s team after Kurita left.

DW: Tell us about the design of the book.

Hamish Smyth: When we went to Japan to meet Kurita, we also spoke to printers there. We decided on many of the specifications, some with a nod to typical Japanese techniques. The book will be enclosed in a PVC jacket, a typical method in Japan, with the title screen-printed on the jacket.

The white hardcover boards will be raw, with all 176 emoji screen-printed in black – half on the front, half on the back. The inside of the book is interesting for us, because this is the first time we’ve designed a dual language book. That comes with its own challenges, but we’ll be keeping the design very simple and in line with our previous titles. After all, it’s all about the design we’re showcasing, not our own creativity. We like to get out of the way.

DW: What do you think is the secret to the mass appeal of emoji?

HS: I think the secret to emoji’s success lies in their simplicity. The original emoji had a very limited canvas of 12×12 pixels to work with, so 148 pixels total. That constraint was due to screen resolution, but also data transfer rates of that period.

Today, an emoji might be designed with vector tools (effectively an unlimited resolution) and will end up measuring at least 256×256 pixels. That’s over 65,000 more pixels to work with. But like any great logo, the simple ones are always the best. It’s more difficult to convey an idea in the simplest way possible, and that’s what Kurita was able to achieve.

Today’s emoji are more nuanced and detailed, to the point that we have dozens for subtle differences in facial expressions – but there is something so pure and refined about the original set that we were drawn to as designers.

DW: What do you think the future holds for the emoji? Will it eradicate the need for words altogether in the not-too-distant future?

HS: This is actually a common misconception about emoji. Their original intent was to supplement words and help convey emotion, not replace them. When we write, emotion can become lost, or the emotive intent of a message can get confused. Emoji was invented to help solve this problem.

As the saying goes, a picture says a thousand words, so using pictures with words helps add to their meaning. When emoji launched in the West, a lot of people thought the idea was to replace text. Some people still try to use it this way, and it certainly can be used as a replacement to text for simple ideas but it’s not supposed to replace text all together.

In a way it’s an evolution of written language, which welds together the very first primitive, symbol-based communication that humans used with digital text communication. We’ve come full circle, which is pretty cool. And that’s why we think this is important work worth analysing and preserving.

For more info about Standards Manual’s crowdfunding campaign to publish the Emoji book and accompanying app, head here.

The post Emoji: documenting the design story of an “accidental masterpiece” appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Emoji: documenting the design story of an “accidental masterpiece”

Design Week Latest Issue - 30 April, 2018 - 13:37

Design Week: Tell us about how the original emoji came about.

Jesse Reed: The basic history goes like this – NTT DoCoMo is a large Japanese telecommunications company that was founded in 1991. Between 1991 and 1999, the company developed a revolutionary software called “i-mode”, primarily used for pagers and emails. A feature of i-mode was a pictorial component, and this is when the heart emoji was introduced to its interface. Shigetaka Kurita was an employee at DoCoMo working on the i-mode team, and in 1999 he was tasked with expanding the collection of “picture characters” (in other words, the emoji) into the i-mode software.

Kurita was limited to a 12×12 pixel grid, which was dictated by the screen technology at the time. Each emoji had to fit within this framework and there were no shortcuts. Because the grid is an even number, there is no way to actually centre any of the symmetrical emoji. This was a challenge that Kurita had to overcome during the design process.

Each emoji was a representation of an object most commonly found in Japanese culture. Kurita credits magazines and common street symbols, among other things, as a source of inspiration for the chosen emoji. He developed 176 emoji in approximately five weeks, and they were released immediately. There were no focus groups or testing, they simply wanted to see what would happen. The rest, as we all know, is history.

DW: Why do you think it took Western countries so long to catch on?

JR: I guess it’s like anything else that we don’t catch on to from the East, or other parts of the Western world for that matter. Why does Japan have taxi cabs with back doors that are opened by the driver, but the US doesn’t? Because Japanese people are so polite that it would be unthinkable for them to open their own door during their service. It’s specific to their culture.

I think emoji is very similar, and again, closely-related to Japanese life. Emotion and expression is arguably more intensified with a conversation in Japanese than it is in English. So when texting became a normal way of communicating, the lack of emotional impact was lost. They figured out a way to resolve the lack of additional expression with the use of pictures, and it worked.

We can’t speak for all of the Western world, but I would say there’s a fair bit of fascination with how other cultures communicate and the nuances of contrasting lifestyles. We’re a global society now, and that’s because we’re connected by the internet. It sounds so obvious that companies like Google and Apple would include emoji in the operating systems, but it takes a critical mass to influence that shift. Enough people were downloading apps to use emoji, so it was the natural next step – 10, long years later, that is. Maybe one day, emoticons will be cool again? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Shigetaka Kurita’s original development sketches

DW: You’ve described the design of the emoji as an “accidental masterpiece”. Why did you choose it for your next project?

JR: The idea was brought to us directly by Kickstarter. DoCoMo had approached someone at Kickstarter about doing an app that would include all the original emoji, and it was also at that time that the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) acquisition was on display. MoMA had too many things going on at the time so Kickstarter asked if we were interested. We had never done an app before so there was a slight hesitation, but we asked if DoCoMo had any sketches or drawings from the original set and they did. Once we saw Kurita’s original design process, we instantly thought this would make a great book.

DW: What are you planning to include in the book?

JR: Emoji will open with an introduction by Kurita, and Paul Galloway and Paola Antonelli from MoMA – who were responsible for the museum acquiring the designs – will also write an essay for the book. This will focus on the historical context and social relevancy of the emoji.

The bulk of the book will be the 176 emoji in their original form. Each emoji will be displayed on a single spread, including the colour version at an enlarged scale and full-size (how it would appear on a phone screen), as well as the emoji placed on its 12×12 pixel grid to show the nuances of each design.

The book will also include the original thumbnail sketches from Kurita – a particularly fascinating and, from our knowledge, rarely seen piece. It comprises a sheet of paper full of small emoji sketches, very roughly drawn and put together. It’s essentially the master idea-mapping chart for when Kurita and his team were deciding which objects to include. Lastly, we will also be including the extended set of 76 emojis that was developed by DoCoMo’s team after Kurita left.

DW: Tell us about the design of the book.

Hamish Smyth: When we went to Japan to meet Kurita, we also spoke to printers there. We decided on many of the specifications, some with a nod to typical Japanese techniques. The book will be enclosed in a PVC jacket, a typical method in Japan, with the title screen-printed on the jacket.

The white hardcover boards will be raw, with all 176 emoji screen-printed in black – half on the front, half on the back. The inside of the book is interesting for us, because this is the first time we’ve designed a dual language book. That comes with its own challenges, but we’ll be keeping the design very simple and in line with our previous titles. After all, it’s all about the design we’re showcasing, not our own creativity. We like to get out of the way.

DW: What do you think is the secret to the mass appeal of emoji?

HS: I think the secret to emoji’s success lies in their simplicity. The original emoji had a very limited canvas of 12×12 pixels to work with, so 148 pixels total. That constraint was due to screen resolution, but also data transfer rates of that period.

Today, an emoji might be designed with vector tools (effectively an unlimited resolution) and will end up measuring at least 256×256 pixels. That’s over 65,000 more pixels to work with. But like any great logo, the simple ones are always the best. It’s more difficult to convey an idea in the simplest way possible, and that’s what Kurita was able to achieve.

Today’s emoji are more nuanced and detailed, to the point that we have dozens for subtle differences in facial expressions – but there is something so pure and refined about the original set that we were drawn to as designers.

DW: What do you think the future holds for the emoji? Will it eradicate the need for words altogether in the not-too-distant future?

HS: This is actually a common misconception about emoji. Their original intent was to supplement words and help convey emotion, not replace them. When we write, emotion can become lost, or the emotive intent of a message can get confused. Emoji was invented to help solve this problem.

As the saying goes, a picture says a thousand words, so using pictures with words helps add to their meaning. When emoji launched in the West, a lot of people thought the idea was to replace text. Some people still try to use it this way, and it certainly can be used as a replacement to text for simple ideas but it’s not supposed to replace text all together.

In a way it’s an evolution of written language, which welds together the very first primitive, symbol-based communication that humans used with digital text communication. We’ve come full circle, which is pretty cool. And that’s why we think this is important work worth analysing and preserving.

For more info about Standards Manual’s crowdfunding campaign to publish the Emoji book and accompanying app, head here.

The post Emoji: documenting the design story of an “accidental masterpiece” appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Emoji: documenting the design story of an “accidental masterpiece”

Design Week News - 30 April, 2018 - 13:37

Design Week: Tell us about how the original emoji came about.

Jesse Reed: The basic history goes like this – NTT DoCoMo is a large Japanese telecommunications company that was founded in 1991. Between 1991 and 1999, the company developed a revolutionary software called “i-mode”, primarily used for pagers and emails. A feature of i-mode was a pictorial component, and this is when the heart emoji was introduced to its interface. Shigetaka Kurita was an employee at DoCoMo working on the i-mode team, and in 1999 he was tasked with expanding the collection of “picture characters” (in other words, the emoji) into the i-mode software.

Kurita was limited to a 12×12 pixel grid, which was dictated by the screen technology at the time. Each emoji had to fit within this framework and there were no shortcuts. Because the grid is an even number, there is no way to actually centre any of the symmetrical emoji. This was a challenge that Kurita had to overcome during the design process.

Each emoji was a representation of an object most commonly found in Japanese culture. Kurita credits magazines and common street symbols, among other things, as a source of inspiration for the chosen emoji. He developed 176 emoji in approximately five weeks, and they were released immediately. There were no focus groups or testing, they simply wanted to see what would happen. The rest, as we all know, is history.

DW: Why do you think it took Western countries so long to catch on?

JR: I guess it’s like anything else that we don’t catch on to from the East, or other parts of the Western world for that matter. Why does Japan have taxi cabs with back doors that are opened by the driver, but the US doesn’t? Because Japanese people are so polite that it would be unthinkable for them to open their own door during their service. It’s specific to their culture.

I think emoji is very similar, and again, closely-related to Japanese life. Emotion and expression is arguably more intensified with a conversation in Japanese than it is in English. So when texting became a normal way of communicating, the lack of emotional impact was lost. They figured out a way to resolve the lack of additional expression with the use of pictures, and it worked.

We can’t speak for all of the Western world, but I would say there’s a fair bit of fascination with how other cultures communicate and the nuances of contrasting lifestyles. We’re a global society now, and that’s because we’re connected by the internet. It sounds so obvious that companies like Google and Apple would include emoji in the operating systems, but it takes a critical mass to influence that shift. Enough people were downloading apps to use emoji, so it was the natural next step – 10, long years later, that is. Maybe one day, emoticons will be cool again? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Shigetaka Kurita’s original development sketches

DW: You’ve described the design of the emoji as an “accidental masterpiece”. Why did you choose it for your next project?

JR: The idea was brought to us directly by Kickstarter. DoCoMo had approached someone at Kickstarter about doing an app that would include all the original emoji, and it was also at that time that the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) acquisition was on display. MoMA had too many things going on at the time so Kickstarter asked if we were interested. We had never done an app before so there was a slight hesitation, but we asked if DoCoMo had any sketches or drawings from the original set and they did. Once we saw Kurita’s original design process, we instantly thought this would make a great book.

DW: What are you planning to include in the book?

JR: Emoji will open with an introduction by Kurita, and Paul Galloway and Paola Antonelli from MoMA – who were responsible for the museum acquiring the designs – will also write an essay for the book. This will focus on the historical context and social relevancy of the emoji.

The bulk of the book will be the 176 emoji in their original form. Each emoji will be displayed on a single spread, including the colour version at an enlarged scale and full-size (how it would appear on a phone screen), as well as the emoji placed on its 12×12 pixel grid to show the nuances of each design.

The book will also include the original thumbnail sketches from Kurita – a particularly fascinating and, from our knowledge, rarely seen piece. It comprises a sheet of paper full of small emoji sketches, very roughly drawn and put together. It’s essentially the master idea-mapping chart for when Kurita and his team were deciding which objects to include. Lastly, we will also be including the extended set of 76 emojis that was developed by DoCoMo’s team after Kurita left.

DW: Tell us about the design of the book.

Hamish Smyth: When we went to Japan to meet Kurita, we also spoke to printers there. We decided on many of the specifications, some with a nod to typical Japanese techniques. The book will be enclosed in a PVC jacket, a typical method in Japan, with the title screen-printed on the jacket.

The white hardcover boards will be raw, with all 176 emoji screen-printed in black – half on the front, half on the back. The inside of the book is interesting for us, because this is the first time we’ve designed a dual language book. That comes with its own challenges, but we’ll be keeping the design very simple and in line with our previous titles. After all, it’s all about the design we’re showcasing, not our own creativity. We like to get out of the way.

DW: What do you think is the secret to the mass appeal of emoji?

HS: I think the secret to emoji’s success lies in their simplicity. The original emoji had a very limited canvas of 12×12 pixels to work with, so 148 pixels total. That constraint was due to screen resolution, but also data transfer rates of that period.

Today, an emoji might be designed with vector tools (effectively an unlimited resolution) and will end up measuring at least 256×256 pixels. That’s over 65,000 more pixels to work with. But like any great logo, the simple ones are always the best. It’s more difficult to convey an idea in the simplest way possible, and that’s what Kurita was able to achieve.

Today’s emoji are more nuanced and detailed, to the point that we have dozens for subtle differences in facial expressions – but there is something so pure and refined about the original set that we were drawn to as designers.

DW: What do you think the future holds for the emoji? Will it eradicate the need for words altogether in the not-too-distant future?

HS: This is actually a common misconception about emoji. Their original intent was to supplement words and help convey emotion, not replace them. When we write, emotion can become lost, or the emotive intent of a message can get confused. Emoji was invented to help solve this problem.

As the saying goes, a picture says a thousand words, so using pictures with words helps add to their meaning. When emoji launched in the West, a lot of people thought the idea was to replace text. Some people still try to use it this way, and it certainly can be used as a replacement to text for simple ideas but it’s not supposed to replace text all together.

In a way it’s an evolution of written language, which welds together the very first primitive, symbol-based communication that humans used with digital text communication. We’ve come full circle, which is pretty cool. And that’s why we think this is important work worth analysing and preserving.

For more info about Standards Manual’s crowdfunding campaign to publish the Emoji book and accompanying app, head here.

The post Emoji: documenting the design story of an “accidental masterpiece” appeared first on Design Week.

Categories: art & design

Interview: Media And Retail Combine For A New Consumer Experience

psfk - 30 April, 2018 - 12:15
New Stand founder Andrew Deitchman discusses a retail experience that blends digital media with product discovery, loyalty benefits and the convenience of an old-school newsstand
Categories: art & design

Video: When Fashion And Tech Touch

psfk - 30 April, 2018 - 12:00
Previous PSFK conference speaker Billie Whitehouse considers all aspects of the product experience, including smell and touch, to design wearables.
Categories: art & design

Paint a touchpad on your wall to control lights with a swipe

New Scientist Headlines - 30 April, 2018 - 11:00
Covering surfaces with a thin layer of conductive material lets you turn on lights and fast-forward films by touching the wall
Categories: science

Our understanding of the universe’s expansion is really wrong

New Scientist Headlines - 30 April, 2018 - 10:52
Last week, the Gaia spacecraft released the best 3D map of our galaxy, which revealed scars in the Milky Way and deepened confusion about how fast the cosmos is expanding
Categories: science
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